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 Post subject: Galleon/Carrack/Galleon?
PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 12:20 am 
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Work has all but dried up and I am still waiting for my first jab, so I have been reviewing my things to do at home list. Some of my projects are waiting for specialised shops to open again. :cry:
Some say that if you do the tasks you enjoy most first, that less pleasant tasks will be that much easier. Or maybe you'll just say fuck the rest I'll do as I please! :hehe: Top of my list now is to build a 'galleon'.......Ok "It's only a model"........"Ssshh!" lOl

At 1 to 70 scale (it sort of looks about right) it will be around 15 inches long and 20 inches high. I am making it out of card strips and glue, with the help of a few Stanley knife blades, so it shouldn't tax the limited finances. I used to scratch build card models when pre prepared kits of things I liked were unobtainable.
I have laid a keel built up from layers of card strip and have fitted hull frames and cross beams with the aid of formers. The shapes and scaling of the card 'timbers' is getting quite complex.
The plan is to build the entire frame then plank out the interior before the outer hull....obviously. The masts will be from sections of dowel rods and larger old paintbrushes. Full rigging and cotton sails will also feature. I have also been collecting coffee stirrers from Costa for over a year, which should come in handy. I might even paint the hull with car underseal to get an authentic patina! :yc:

When I say galleon, I mean a sort of missing link between a carrack and a galleon, which must have occured sometime in the mid to late 1500s. I want it to be slightly gothic and quirky, but not as wacky as the 'Durmstrang' (Harry Potter), and essentially made up as I go along rather than to drawings. Whatever I make, someone is bound to ask if it's supposed to be the 'Mary Rose' or 'The Black Pearl'. :roll:

When you start looking into such old ships you discover cogs, kraikes, carracks, carravels as well as galleons. My research delved into early voyages of exploration, Portugese 'black ships', Dutch seafaring and eventually to William Adams who was the inspiration for the James Clavel novel 'Shogun'. Remember the classic TV series with Richard Chamberlain and Toshiro Mifune; "Anjin San!" 8-)

The story of William Adams is even more remarkable. As well as being a veteran of the battle with the Spanish Amada, Adams became a pilot for Dutch traders and then led an expedition to expand trade most of the way around the world. Starting with 5 ships and 500 men, his expedition was reduced to only 2 ships as they crossed the Pacific. After nearly two years he arrived at Japan with only one ship and 23 men remaining out of 100, only 9 of which were fit enough to stand. The rest is history! :worthy: ...but hey I don't want to spoil it. I might have to read Shogun again to compete the story even if it isn't strictly accurate. ;)


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 1:46 am 
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I bought loft insulation top up, and did half, and lost interest. I realised last week that I bought it over 12 months ago :( I guess the mice up the shed have been cosy this Winter.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 8:40 am 
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Interesting subject the galleon build. I haven't done anything like that, except for the usual Airfix/Revel kits when a youngster.
If you are intersted in the real life adventures, there is a good book "The Circumnavigators" which tells the tale of how eventually the world was sailed around, more by luck than judgement.
What these people went through, and many of them died simply due to scurvy or other illnesses caused by being shipbound for long periods and suffering a bad diet,is pretty amazing.


Now about to retire at the ripe old age of 62, I have left a lot of decorating and other stuff to keep me occupied and both Buells need to be got back on the road. Lockdown hasn't affected me much finacially due to the nature of my job, but I want to do my own thing now an can afford to. Morefresh air and exercise coming.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 9:08 am 
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Mitch wrote:
Now about to retire at the ripe old age of 62, I have left a lot of decorating and other stuff to keep me occupied and both Buells need to be got back on the road. Lockdown hasn't affected me much finacially due to the nature of my job, but I want to do my own thing now an can afford to. Morefresh air and exercise coming.


:yt: 2 more years for me .ps( only work part time 2 days a week ) :hehe:
already been decorating , only a couple of rooms , suprising how much time and enjoyment you can have/get from a few tins of paint :yup:
now better weather is here its gardening time and outdoor painting ,along with bike and car servicing time .
stay safe, hope to see you soon when we are allowed out to play .

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 9:16 am 
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Yes exercise is a good thing at our age. :yup:

Thanks for the reference. ;) I spent a long time away from reading about seafaring. My boarding house at school had a favorite punishment of making us write out the history of our namesake 'Anson' who circumnavigated the globe in his most famous mission for the navy. The usual penalty was to write out the whole story three times, each time about a page and a half of fullscap (about 1.6 x A4), hand written in ink, and it would be checked for errors and spelling! Sadists! Maybe that's why sea cadets preferred to get away to sea? lOl


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 9:19 am 
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To Mitch. lOl


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 11:38 am 
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To Edd. :old:

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 2:09 pm 
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Just to add to this. My father worked for the local electricity board (SWEB) for many years. They had a very good social club which included a sailing section. Back in the 60's they had an old chapel as a store cum workshop for the small dinghy's. They built some of the Mirror dinghys and went on to build a couple of larger yachts for racing, one of which is still in use today.

My father quit sailing in his early 80's as it was getting too much effort for him. He is 95 now and always has been my hero. Because of him I have always enjoyed water sports and hopefully will be out on the water at sometime in the future.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 4:12 pm 
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Cue Finmows......

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:25 pm 
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:rotfl:


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 6:53 pm 
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Maz wrote:
Cue Finmows......

No good getting me involved in this....


I know fuck all about sailing ;) lOl

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 18, 2021 8:52 pm 
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We built a raft to take part in the Ross-on-Wye annual raft race in 1987. We used marine ply to build a couple of floatation units and my mate used lots of Cascamite sealant adhesive he obtained from his works (unwitting sponsor lOl ).
We also incorporated several under the waterline laminar flow streamline devices so the raft went quicker than it should. ;)
We didn’t win. There were too many of those long semi-pro oil drum torpedo cats with sharp fibre-glass bows and 6 to 8 oarsmen and women, the crews of which accused US of cheating! :roll:

We got the last laugh and won the constructors shield. :ner:


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2021 2:42 pm 
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Maz wrote:
Cue Finmows......


:rotfl:

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2021 5:48 pm 
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edd wrote:
We built a raft to take part in the Ross-on-Wye annual raft race in 1987. We used marine ply to build a couple of floatation units and my mate used lots of Cascamite sealant adhesive he obtained from his works (unwitting sponsor lOl ).
We also incorporated several under the waterline laminar flow streamline devices so the raft went quicker than it should. ;)
We didn’t win. There were too many of those long semi-pro oil drum torpedo cats with sharp fibre-glass bows and 6 to 8 oarsmen and women, the crews of which accused US of cheating! :roll:

We got the last laugh and won the constructors shield. :ner:


:sun: :yup:


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2021 9:49 pm 
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Mitch wrote:
Just to add to this. My father worked for the local electricity board (SWEB) for many years. They had a very good social club which included a sailing section. Back in the 60's they had an old chapel as a store cum workshop for the small dinghy's. They built some of the Mirror dinghys and went on to build a couple of larger yachts for racing, one of which is still in use today.

My father quit sailing in his early 80's as it was getting too much effort for him. He is 95 now and always has been my hero. Because of him I have always enjoyed water sports and hopefully will be out on the water at sometime in the future.



Yes, I love to see old boats which were so well made they have survived the years. We have the Bodacia in Gloucester, a restored Dunkirk veteran which still does passenger trips along the canal from Glos docks. Some years ago l met the owners of a much smaller beautiful looking Camper & Nicholson style cabin cruiser in the docks, the type with a large flat top forward deck area and rear wheel house position. The owners were restoring it and revarnishing all the teak decking. They planned to motor over to France for a Dunkirk veterans tribute meeting. Brave of them even today given the size of the tub! :worthy:


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